new books: sports, leisure studies, and walking histories

zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzchduranI am Durán: my autobiography, by Roberto Durán

GV1132 D8674 A3 2016, Parks Library Floor 2

They called him Manos de Piedra Hands of Stone and he was one of the greatest boxers of all time. Now Roberto Duran tells his unbelievable story: from the streets of Panama to being crowned one of the Four Kings, along with Hearns, Leonard, and Hagler, as he blazed a trail through the Golden Age of Boxing.


Born into abject poverty, barely able to read or write, Duran quickly realized that his fists could both protect him on the streets and put food on the table. His reputation was established on the day when, for a bet, he knocked down a horse with a single punch. At the age of twenty-one, he claimed his first world title, against Ken Buchanan at Madison Square Garden. The legend of Manos de Piedra was born, but his most glorious moment was yet to come.


In 1980, Duran delivered one of the greatest upsets in boxing history by defeating the previously unbeatable Sugar Ray Leonard. But greater fame brought greater distractions, and Duran s endless partying took its toll before the two superstars faced each other again. Here, for the first time ever, Duran confronts the debacle of the rematch that entered sporting folklore, and the truth behind the moment he was heard to utter the infamous words No mas No more.


Duran s explosive performances in the ring were matched only by the volatility of his life outside it. He lurched from living like royalty to bankruptcy and, after being written off as a boxing also-ran, made a bloody, legendary comeback that gave his career the ultimate ending, and finally brought redemption. He came from nothing, and changed the world. I Am Duran is the autobiography of one of boxing s most iconic legends.


yucks-book-cover-669x1024The Yucks: two years in Tampa with the losingest time in NFL history, by Jason Vuic

GV956 T35 V85 2016, Parks Library Floor 2

Long before their first Super Bowl victory in 2003, the Tampa Bay Buccaneers did something no NFL team had ever done before and that none will ever likely do again: They lost twenty-six games in a row. It started in 1976, in their first season as an expansion team, and it lasted until the penultimate game of the 1977 season, when they defeated Archie Manning and the New Orleans Saints on the road. After the game, Saints coach Hank Stram was fired and said, “We are all very ashamed of what happened. Ashamed for our people, our fans, the organization, everybody.” When the Bucs arrived back in Tampa, they were mobbed, and eight thousand people came to a victory party. It was the beginning of a new streak for a team that had come to be called “The Yucks.” They won their final game at home, and the fans tore down the goalposts.

This was no ordinary streak. It was an existential curse that unfolded week after week, with Johnny Carson leading the charge on The Tonight Show. Along with their ridiculous mascot and uniforms, which were known as “the Creamsicles,” the Yucks were a national punch line and personnel purgatory. Owned by the miserly and bulbous-nosed Hugh Culverhouse, who charged players for sodas in the locker room, the team was the end of the line for Heisman Trophy winner and University of Florida hero Steve Spurrier, and a banishment for former Cowboy defensive end Pat Toomay after he wrote a tell-all book about his time on “America’s Team.” Many players on the Bucs had been out of football for years, and it wasn’t uncommon for them to have to introduce themselves in the huddle. They were coached by the ever-quotable college great John McKay, whose press conferences were infamous. “We can’t win at home and we can’t win on the road,” he said. “What we need is a neutral site.”


footballThe perfect pass: American genius and the reinvention of football, by S.C. Gwynne

GV950 G99 2016, Parks Library Floor 2

In the tradition of Michael Lewis’s Moneyball, award-winning historian S.C. Gwynne tells the incredible story of how two unknown coaches revolutionized American football at every level, from high school to the NFL.

Hal Mumme is one of a handful of authentic offensive geniuses in the history of American football. The Perfect Pass is the story of how he irreverently destroyed and re-created the game.

 

 

 


walkingWalking histories: 1800-1914, edited by C. Bryant, A. Burns, and P. Readman

GV199.5 W365 2016, Parks Library Floor 2

Few historians have written about walking, despite its obvious centrality to the human condition. Focusing on the period 1800-1914, this book examines the practices and meanings of walking in the context of transformative modernity. It boldly suggests that once historians place walking at the heart of their analyses, exciting new perspectives on themes central to the ‘long nineteenth century’ emerge. Walking Histories, 1800-1914 adopts a global perspective, including contributions from specialists in the history and culture of Great Britain, North America, Australia, Russia, East-Central Europe, and South Asia. Critically engaging with recent research, the contributions within offer fresh insights for academic experts, while remaining accessible to student readers. This book will be essential reading for those interested in movement, travel, leisure, urban history, and environmental history.


9781138898844_200x_re-imagining-leisure-studiesRe-imagining leisure studies, by T. Blackshaw

GV14 B534 2017, Parks Library Floor 2

In this provocative new book, Tony Blackshaw argues that Leisure Studies is in a quiet but deep state of crisis. The twenty-first century has brought profound change to all aspects of society, including a plurality of new leisure worlds, and traditional concepts of Leisure Studies fail to capture this richness. This book aims to re-invigorate Leisure Studies by revealing and unpacking these leisure worlds, thereby changing the way we think about leisure and the way we do Leisure Studies. Both trivial and serious in its implications, it is precisely this paradox that makes leisure such a fascinating subject of study. Re-Imagining Leisure Studies presents a new and radical set of methodological rules for studying leisure trends and cultures in contemporary society. It discusses the critical issues that underpin recent developments in leisure theory and explores the key themes of social class, community, politics, freedom and globalization. Marking a turning point in the reception and understanding of Leisure Studies, this book is vital reading for all students and scholars with a social scientific interest in leisure.

 

 


 

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